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Now THIS is a family portrait.⁣ ⁣ Meet Wilbur (@wilbur_allen_bashar). He’s a Ba-Shar — part basset hound, part Shar-Pei — with an affinity for bow ties and a love for the “Dumplings,” his guinea pig friends, Market Price and Rumpadump.⁣ ⁣ “They genuinely all get along,” says their human Jen. “Wilbur has grown so close to the Dumplings that he seems to think he’s just a guinea pig himself.”⁣ ⁣ #WeeklyFluff⁣ ⁣ Photo by @wilbur_allen_bashar

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For Sebastian Yatra (@sebastianyatra), it’s not a fiesta without the fam. 🎉 Today, the Colombian singer celebrates his birthday — and the last day of #LatinxHeritageMonth – with a party that is both familiar and fun. 🎺🎂🎶⁣ ⁣ Reel by @sebastianyatra⁣

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Artist Preta Wolzak’s (@pretawolzak) textured mixed-media pieces focus on hard issues, including gender equality, representation and race. Her collections “Ma Petit Inuite” and “Arctic Charade” (pictured) confronts the impact of humans’ behavior on our planet and the effects of climate change.⁣ ⁣ “I am driven by my irritation of how we are treating the globe, like tourism at Antarctica and the Arctic and mining for resources in those particular areas which are so vital for the balance in the world,” says Preta, who incorporates embroidery, sequins, acrylics and leather into her work.⁣ ⁣ “I love to use acrobats in my work, who seem to stand for joyfulness, carelessness, sparkle, like what tourism looks like on first sight. People need entertainment and they see the world as one big amusement park.⁣ ⁣ The acrobats stand for the foolish behavior of mankind ruining its environment, which now even threatens to spread out to the last untouched areas of our planet: the North and South Pole.⁣ ⁣ I think it’s better that people get my message through humor and joyfulness. It can be serious, humorous and aesthetic at the same time.⁣” ⁣ #ThisWeekOnInstagram⁣ ⁣ Art by @pretawolzak

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Artist Stitchguy’s (@stitchguy) intimate portrayals of gay couples play with traditional motifs of art and embroidery. His black and white linear representations of the male body are often surrounded or intertwined with bold colors from nature.⁣ ⁣ “I am constantly exploring my style of expression within a classical aesthetic. The depiction of plants in embroidery is a classical theme, and this is also important to me,” says the Japanese artist, who studied fashion in art school, then worked in the industry after graduation.⁣ ⁣ “I moved away from fashion for a while, due to a strong desire to create artwork that could express more personal aspects. My strengths lay in using needle, thread and cloth, so I started studying embroidery anew and began to make gay embroidery art.”⁣ ⁣ Inspired by the artist’s own memories, the work draws on Stitchguy’s personal experiences as inspiration for its broader LGBTQ+ focus. “All of my works are very lovingly and carefully made.⁣” ⁣ #ThisWeekOnInstagram⁣ ⁣ Art by @stitchguy

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No paint is used in the making of these portraits. All of Bisa Butler’s (@bisabutler) large-scale appliqué artworks are made up of tiny pieces of fabric — cut, sewn and quilted on a long arm sewing machine.⁣ ⁣ “My work celebrates the African American tradition of quilting and portrays the beauty, strength, pride and dignity of Black people. I am inviting a re-imagining and a contemporary dialogue about age-old issues, still problematic in our culture, through the comforting, embracing medium of the quilt.⁣ ⁣ I am telling the story of ordinary people — Black people — whose stories have been deliberately ignored, misconstrued or outright denied.⁣ ⁣ My subjects stand in defiance against racist stereotypes and show African Americans as people who value family, community, education and hard work.⁣ ⁣ I hope people view my work and see the expressions of joy, the vibrancy of colors and the quiet dignity of my portraits. I am expressing what I believe is the equal value of all humans. I hope when people see my work they can see a reflection of themselves and come to terms with the truth of the matter — all people are created equal.”⁣ ⁣ #ThisWeekOnInstagram⁣ ⁣ Art by @bisabutler

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“I want to be the best me. And to be the best me, I have to fully embrace who I am,” says Olympian Markus Thormeyer (@lilmarquenis), a 23-year-old competitive swimmer and student at the University of British Columbia.⁣ ⁣ While training with Team Canada for the 2016 Rio Olympics, Markus came out to his teammates.⁣ ⁣ “I wasn’t being who I am, even to some of my closest friends,” he says. “I didn’t want to go to the Olympics and not be me because then I wouldn’t perform to the best that I could.”⁣ ⁣ Markus credits coming out with making him more confident and focused, both in and out of the pool.⁣ ⁣ “It just felt easier, living felt easier every day. You don’t realize how much it adds up until after when you don’t have to do it anymore. You’re like, ‘Wow, I have the energy to be me.’”⁣ ⁣ Earlier this year, Markus shared his story to inspire other young athletes to embrace their authentic selves.⁣ ⁣ “I was always looking for role models growing up. When I did find a story about a gay athlete it was inspiring,” he says. “If one gay kid reads my story and is inspired, that’d be a win for me.”⁣ ⁣ In honor of #NationalComingOutDay, we’re sharing Markus’ story as we continue to celebrate members of the LGBTQ+ community who #ShareWithPride. 🏊‍♂️🌈✨⁣ ⁣ Photo of @lilmarquenis by @emilyoverholt

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#HelloFrom Vase Rock, located just off Liuqiu Island in Pingtung County, Taiwan.⁣ ⁣ We are dreaming of this raised coral rock painted with drone light from above. Over time, Vase Rock eroded at its base from the clear waters below, which are also home to endangered green sea turtles. 🐢⁣ ⁣ Photo by @makclickz

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Have no fear, Charlot’s (@charlot_cat_ ) here!⁣ ⁣ This European shorthair has a distinguished look — note that aristocratic French hairstyle and distinctive mustache — and a playful personality.⁣ ⁣ #WeeklyFluff⁣ ⁣ Video by @charlot_cat_

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“You don’t have to wait until it’s the ‘right time’ to get started because you’re the only person who can create your reality.”⁣ ⁣ For 18-year-old Greisy Hernandez Gutierrez (@greisyhh), her reality is advocating for mental health resources for Gen Z and people of color with her organization @laschicaschulas. It also means voting in the US presidential election on November 3.⁣ ⁣ “Voting is a tangible way to get your voice heard and advocate for marginalized communities. My grandma is approaching retirement after years of working overtime and I’m motivated to vote for representatives that prioritize healthcare and workers’ rights.”⁣ ⁣ If you want to make a difference but aren’t sure how, Greisy suggests making it personal. “Start local with the issues affecting your community and reach out to organizations already doing work around this. I promise you’ll find at least one to contribute to.”⁣ ⁣ This week, we’re sharing voices of young activists voting for the first time in a US presidential election. You can register to vote, check your status, learn how to vote by mail and more at our link in bio. ✨⁣ ⁣ Photo by @greisyhh

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“I plan to show the world that my Marajoara, Tapajônica and Black culture has an incredible power to transform people.” 🙌⁣ ⁣ Labo Maurício Lopes de Oliveira (@laboyoung) uses natural materials to create wearable art. Each piece represents his identity and a sense of Black joy.⁣ ⁣ “It is important to celebrate Black joy because in the midst of structural problems like racism and colonialism, we need to remember how important our culture is, how rich it is and remember that it keeps us alive," says Labo, who lives in Belém do Pará in the Brazilian Amazon.⁣ ⁣ Watch our IGTV to see some of Labo’s stunning looks and learn more about what brings him joy.⁣ ⁣ #ShareBlackStories 🖤⁣ ⁣ Photo of @laboyoung by Bruno Coutinho

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Home. ❤️ For artist Labo Maurício Lopes de Oliveira (@laboyoung), it’s the force behind his wearable pieces created from natural materials like leaves and coconut straws.⁣ ⁣ “My work is how I enhance my Black, Marajoara and Ribeirinha culture,” says Labo, who lives in Belém do Pará in the Brazilian Amazon.⁣ ⁣ “It started in my childhood, through games I played with my mom where we built a playful world — creating games and toys from objects we found in our backyard, either foliage or seeds. These memories are with me even today and it’s where I still find inspiration for creation and experimentation.”⁣ ⁣ #ShareBlackStories

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“Young people have the power in this movement. We are the ones inheriting this country.”⁣ ⁣ Sanna Legan (@sannalegan) is a 20-year-old student, artist and social justice activist on a mission to get young people to vote in the 2020 US election. “This is the beginning of my generation creating a stronger, more just and kind world.”⁣ ⁣ Her advice for young people who want to make a difference? “Volunteer, protest, promote impactful work and hold your community accountable. Find out your city councilperson, congresspeople, governor and senator. Call their offices, write letters, create petitions and educate yourself about issues. Above all, never underestimate your own personal power to make change.”⁣ ⁣ This week, we’re sharing voices of young activists voting for the first time in a US presidential election. You can register to vote, check your status, learn how to vote by mail and more at our link in bio. ✨⁣ ⁣ Photo of @sannalegan by @lake.lewis

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“Shake things up.” 👊⁣ ⁣ Malavika Kannan (@malavika.kannan) is a 19-year-old author and activist who’s doing just that. And she’s ready to vote in the US election on November 3.⁣ ⁣ “I vote for family and neighbors, to protect our health amidst this epidemic. I vote for my fellow girls of color, my sisters and homegirls, to promote our right to live and thrive joyfully and safely. I vote for my own future, free of the looming threat of climate change.”⁣ ⁣ Malavika has been making a difference by starting @homegirlproject, an organization that builds power among girls of color, and writing “The Bookweaver’s Daughter,” her feminist fantasy novel.⁣ ⁣ “As young women, our stories have tremendous power — to reclaim agency, to disrupt harmful narratives, to build empathy and to imagine better futures. I aspire to help more girls tap into our power, demand our worth and uplift our sisters in the process.”⁣ ⁣ This week, we’re sharing voices of young activists voting for the first time in a US presidential election. You can register to vote, check your status, learn how to vote by mail and more at our link in bio. ✨⁣ ⁣ Photo of @malavika.kannan by @sophia.manolis

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Relatable 🙋‍♀️⁣ Informative 📝⁣ Hilarious 😹⁣ ⁣ The best memes are one — or all — of the above. Check out our story and @memeinsider for more posts and creators that are taking memes to a whole new level.⁣ ⁣ Video by @itsjakeberg; Illustration by @ohhappydani; Video by @ploxyzero

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Where were you when… ⁣ The bottle cap challenge hit 😲 ⁣ All your friends started sharing Area 51 memes 👽⁣ The 10-year challenge took over 👀⁣ It’s Instagram’s birthday today 🎉 and to celebrate, creator Taylor Cassidy (@taylorcassidyj) is taking us on a trip down memory lane with some of the most iconic Instagram moments ever. 🔥

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“Today is Instagram’s birthday and we want to give huge thanks to you — everyone who uses Instagram around the world. Every day you inspire us by how you create trends that push culture forward.⁣ ✨⁣ Since Instagram started, you’ve come here to connect with friends, explore interests and be entertained. Along the way, you created a global community — one that did more and mattered more than we ever dreamed. You’ve transformed industries, sparked iconic cultural moments, supported each other, raised awareness about important issues and turned your passions into a living. ⁣ ✨⁣ Today I’m also thinking a lot about where Instagram is going. To keep up with what’s next, we have to adapt too. Over the coming months, you’ll see some updates on Instagram — like a Reels and shopping tab and a better messaging experience. We’ll share more ways to help creators make a living and small businesses sell their products. ⁣ ✨⁣ Through these changes, you all remain the heart of Instagram. We’re focused on keeping you safe and building new features that fight bullying, improve equity, address fairness and help you feel supported. I’m excited about how these changes will help you create the next wave of culture, and I can’t wait to see how you’ll inspire us next.”⁣ ⁣ —Adam Mosseri (@mosseri), Head of Instagram⁣ ⁣ Art by @naima.almeida

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#HelloFrom Lake Tamblingan, Bali. 💭🍃 We are dreaming of this atmospheric location where the pristine lake, ancient flooded temples and surrounding lush rainforest combine to create this calming scene. Photo by @justkay

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“I come from a family of Mexican-American women who have worked for generations to leave their family with more than they had,” says Cristina Martinez (@sew_trill), a Black and Mexican-American contemporary artist whose bright and beautiful depictions of women of color are inspired by her own family. “My mother, grandma ‘Nana’ and great-grandmother are Mexican-American women whose perseverance and strength are constant themes in my art, which focuses on the ever-evolving cycle of growth and blooming amidst diversity.” This #LatinxHeritageMonth, we’re celebrating Latinx voices that represent the beauty and power of their culture. Read Cristina’s letter to the women in her family below and check out our story to see her art in full bloom. ✨✨✨✨✨✨✨⁣⁣ “To the Family Roots/My Support System, Mom, Grandma 'Nana' and Great-Grandma: Individually and collectively, you possess a fierce ambition to not only survive but thrive. As the roots of our family tree and Mexican-American women, you have harnessed an unshakeable vision and invisible yet tangible strength to grant your family with more opportunities than you were afforded. Single mothers raising children on their own is no easy feat. Nana, you in particular, after the passing of your mother when you were only 7 to working in the fields as a young girl to later raising six children on your own — this independent nature motivates me on a daily basis to carry on our family name and legacy to inspire not only my children, of Black and Mexican roots, but the many Black and brown children around the world who will need watering for the many years of blooming ahead of them. When I struggle with daily tasks or when inner growth seems just out of reach, I recall each of your individual and collective struggles. You give me the clarity and focus to know my own strength even in my darkest moments. It is the memories and stories of Great-Grandma and the fight in you, Nana and Mom, that I pour onto my canvas each and every day, collectively telling the enduring and evolving story of perseverance, independence and growth.” —@sew_trill Collage by @valheria123